Speakers

Master of Ceremonies

Simon Swaffield

Simon Swaffield

Simon Swaffield is Professor of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University, NZ, where he has been discipline leader since 1985. Simon’s research is focused upon two linked areas –landscape dynamics, values and public policy; and theory and research methodology in landscape architecture. He is editor of a widely used reader on Theory in Landscape Architecture (Penn Press 2002), co-editor of a text on Globalisation and Agricultural Landscapes (Cambridge University Press 2010) and co–author of Landscape Architecture Research: Inquiry/Strategy/Design (John Wiley 2011). Simon is a Fellow of the NZILA, a member of the CELA Academy of Fellows, and Honorary Professor at Copenhagen University.


Speakers

Malcolm Paterson

Malcolm Paterson

Previously working as a medical doctor, after completing a masters degree in environmental management. Malcolm has worked now for several years as a heritage and environmental advisor and advocate (for Ngāti Whātua and previously for the New Zealand Historic Places Trust). He is presently the heritage and resource manager for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei. Other experience of note includes several years as an associate director on the Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei Corporate Board and a period as the Treaty of Waitangi Claim Manager for Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara. 

Jacky Bowring

Jacky Bowring

Dr Jacky Bowring is Associate Professor and Head of the School of Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand. Her key areas of interest are design critique, design theory and landscapes of memory. She has published widely in international academic and professional journals, and is the author of A Field Guide to Melancholy (2008) and editor of Landscape Review. Jacky is a registered landscape architect, and has had success in a number of national and international design competitions, including as a member of the winning team, NZ Wood, for last year's 48 Hour Design Challenge for the Christchurch post-quake rebuild.

 Alex Calder

Alex Calder

Alex Calder is an Associate-Professor of English at the University of Auckland and Associate Dean (Academic) for the Faculty of Arts. He currently teaches courses in New Zealand Literature, the Gothic, Literary Theory and Critical Practice, and the writings of Herman Melville and Joseph Conrad. His research, for which he has received a Marsden award, focuses on processes of cultural contact and settlement, particularly with regard to writings from New Zealand, the Pacific, and the United States. Book length publications include: The Writing of New Zealand, a non-fiction anthology; Voyages and Beaches, a collection of essays on early European-Pacific encounters; and Old New Zealand and other Writings, the first scholarly edition of the writings of the 19th century 'Pakeha Maori' author, F. E. Maning. His most recent book is The Settler's Plot: How Stories Take Place in New Zealand (Auckland University Press, 2011).

 

Wade Davis

Wade Davis is an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society. Named by the NGS as one of the Explorers for the Millennium, he has been described as “a rare combination of scientist, scholar, poet and passionate defender of all of life’s diversity.” In recent years his work has taken him to East Africa, Borneo, Nepal, Peru, Polynesia, Tibet, Mali, Benin, Togo, New Guinea, Australia, Colombia, Vanuatu, Mongolia and the high Arctic of Nunuvut and Greenland.

An ethnographer, writer, photographer, and filmmaker, Davis holds degrees in anthropology and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University. Mostly through the Harvard Botanical Museum, he spent over three years in the Amazon and Andes as a plant explorer, living among fifteen indigenous groups in eight Latin American nations while making some 6000 botanical collections. His work later took him to Haiti to investigate folk preparations implicated in the creation of zombies, an assignment that led to his writing Passage of Darkness (1988) and The Serpent and the Rainbow (1986), an international best seller later released by Universal as a motion picture.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/wade-davis/

 Rachel de Lambert

Rachel de Lambert

Rachel is Director of Design at Boffa Miskell New Zealand’s longest established, multidisciplinary landscape architecture consultancy.  The company has over 35 qualified landscape architects as well as urban designers, planners, ecologists, cultural specialists and strong graphic communication, GIS, CAD and 3D capabilities.  Rachel’s practice has included wide experience in landscape planning, landscape resource evaluation as well as specific project design and effect assessment.  In more recent years she has returned to a greater focus on design and leadership of design within professional services companies.  Rachel, who is Christchurch born and bred, recently led the ‘spaces and places’ Anchor Project for the 100 day Blueprint for the Central Christchurch Recovery Plan. 

 Garth Falconer

Garth Falconer

Garth graduated in landscape architecture from Lincoln University,  completed a Masters in urban design from Oxford Brookes (UK) and is fellow of the NZILA.  He is founder and director of Reset Urban Design, a specialised design practise focused on taking strategic projects into a realised form. Previously Garth was a founder and director of Isthmus Group from 1988 to 2008.

Garth is foremost a designer and has over 24 years’ experience leading design teams on large scale urban projects around New Zealand,   Garth has been at the forefront of the development of urban public realm projects such as waterfronts, river edges, parks, streets, plazas and  central city environments. He believes landscape architecture has a critical responsibility in improving the quality and sustainability of life for our people and the wider ecology.

Garth has received national and international recognition.  He has won numerous  national design awards and lectures at the landscape architecture schools at Lincoln, Victoria and Unitec . Garth has presented at conferences and universities in Australia, USA,UK, Greece and Italy.

 Paul Herzich

Paul Herzich

Paul Herzich is a Registered Landscape Architect and is employed by the Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure (DPTI) in Adelaide, South Australia. Paul makes an outstanding contribution to DPTI and the South Australian community by designing road and rail corridor landscapes and visual art which incorporate aspects of the Aboriginal way of life.
Paul is an Ngarrindjeri/Kaurna man. He was the first Aboriginal student to complete a Bachelor of Design Studies in 2000 and a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture in 2002 at the University of Adelaide. For 12 years, Paul held various positions on the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects - SA Group Executive Committee.
In 2010, Paul received the NAIDOC SA ‘Artist of the Year’ Award, and in 2007 the South Australian Premier’s Award for ‘Outstanding Individual Performance in a Workgroup – Landscapes that Integrate Aboriginal Culture’.
Paul is passionate about designing truly enlightening and educational landscapes containing art which combines originality and creative vision.

 Adrian McGregor

Adrian McGregor

Adrian McGregor is a Landscape Architecture and Urban Design professional and managing director of McGregor Coxall, a Sydney and Melbourne based environmental design studio. Graduating with a bachelor of landscape architecture in 1988 he began his career in Sydney and then worked in North America and the UK. He founded McGregor Coxall in 1998 and the Biocity Studio in 2006 to combine practice with research and academia. The firm has received more than 50 awards including the prestigious Topos journal International Landscape Architecture Practice of the Year 2009 presented in Reykjav Iceland. He was also selected as one of Sydney's 100 most creative people on the Creative Catalysts list 2009. In 2012 he won the Prime Minister of Australias Urban Design award. He is currently working on two books relating to city sustainability.

 Michael Pawlyn

Michael Pawlyn

Michael Pawlyn established Exploration in 2007 to focus exclusively on biomimicry. In 2008 the company was short-listed for the Young Architect of the Year Award and the internationally renowned Buckminster Fuller Challenge.

Prior to setting up the company Michael Pawlyn worked with Grimshaw for ten years and was central to the team that radically re-invented horticultural architecture for the Eden Project. He was responsible for leading the design of the Warm Temperate and Humid Tropics Biomes and the subsequent phases that included proposals for a third Biome for plants from dry tropical regions.

He has lectured widely on the subject of sustainable design in the UK and abroad and in May 2005 delivered a talk at the Royal Society of Arts with Ray Anderson, CEO of Interface. In 2007 Michael Pawlyn delivered a talk at Google’s annual ‘Zeitgeist’ conference and, in 2011, became one of only a small handful of architects to have a talk posted on TED.com. In the same year, his book Biomimicry in Architecture was published by the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Michael Pawlyn jointly initiated the Sahara Forest Project which is now being built at pilot stage in Qatar. Exploration is currently working on a range of biomimicry-based architectural projects and a book commissioned by TED.

 Wannaporn Phornprapha

Wannaporn Pui Phornprapha

Wannaporn holds a bachelor degree in Architecture from Chulalongkorn University and a master degree in Landscape Architecture from Harvard University.
Wannaporn is the founder of P Landscape (PLA), a full service landscape architecture firm specializing in high end hotels and resorts throughout the world.  Her work spans from Fiji Islands to London, with most of them in Asia Pacific.  PLA’s work also includes condominiums, streetscapes, public spaces, and high-end private residences.
Prior to starting PLA, Wannaporn worked with honorable professor Decha Boonkam at DSB Associate and Belt Collins Thailand. 
Her work is contemporary landscape architecture that takes into account the practical integration of art and cultural heritage of the surroundings to maintain and enhance the environment and ecology.  Through her work she has grown a stronger interest in the public landscape.  This has led her to projects such as Plum Village in Nakhon Ratchasima, Hospice Hua Hin, and The King Memorial Park and Community Center in Yala province.
Pui likes to read, enjoy holistic food, exercises and travel.

 

Damian Powley

Damian is a descendant of Ngai Tai ki Torere - a small haven along the eastern Bay of Plenty coastline of New Zealand. Since training as a Landscape Architect, his personal focus on understanding iwi landscape issues and engagement processes has brought him full circle to uncovering his own roots here in Tamaki Makaurau, and the relationships that extend through whakapapa and landscapes, back to Torere and beyond. 

For 10 years working in Local Government, and now with the new Auckland Council, he has been responsible for many public open space developments, and leading engagement measures with the diverse communities of South Auckland. "Finding the right balance between project constraints and meaningful outcomes will always vary - however, more and more I find the need to tailor our engagement processes beyond a path of lest resistance - and when we do - the outcomes for some of our communities can literally be life changing, if they are engaged in an appropriate way."

Jim Sinatra

Jim Sinatra

Jim Sinatra is Honourary Fellow of the AILA and Director of Sinatra Murphy Pty Ltd and, an art and landscape studio based in Melbourne, Australia which focuses its work on landscape approaches that celebrate the culture of people and the spirit of nature. Jim has been a practicing landscape architect since 1966 and is an author and educator and is emeritus Professor at RMIT's School of Architecture and Design. Jim draws on his extensive experience in commercial, institutional, community development, municipal and residential landscape projects and public art projects - exploring the variety of work presented by Landscape Architecture rather than constrained by traditional practice. Sinatra Murphy Pty Ltd has received numerous awards from the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects in recognition of its contributions to art, design, and research, and public art projects have been widely acclaimed through awards and reviews.

Rana P.B Singh

Rana P.B. Singh

Rana P.B. Singh (b. 1950), PhD, FJF (Japan), FAAI (Italy), is Professor of Cultural Geography & Heritage Studies, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India, and founding president of the Society of Heritage Planning and Environmental health. He has been involved in studying, performing and promoting the heritage planning, sacred geography & cultural landscapes for the last four decades, as consultant, project director, collaborator and organiser, and as visiting scholar gave seminars on these themes in all parts of the world. His publications include 15 monographs, 26 books, and over 200 research papers. His two recent books (2011) established a fresh vision to landscapes, viz. Sacredscapes, and Heritagescape.

 Yuko Tanabe

Yuko Tanabe

After training and gaining work experience as a landscape designer in the UK, Europe and Middle East, Yuko has now returned to her home country, Japan. She joined IFLA Japan in 2011 as the PR Officer. As PR Officer, she enjoys promoting international cultural exchanges for fellow professionals, helping them to present works in international conferences and symposiums and translating civil engineering and landscape architectural essays for many publications.  Her recent works includes 'Foodscape study group', education, translator/coordinator in the Gardening World Cup, and conference interpreter at Hirado Forum, promoting cultural landscape conservation and World Heritage inscription.

Yuko will be presenting on behalf of her collegues, Dr. Tadashi Takao and Mr. Ryota Kito.

 Paula Villagra

Paula Villagra

Paula is an Architect and Landscape Architect from Chile with a Ph.D from the University of Melbourne in Australia. She is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Environmental Science and Evolution, Faculty of Science, Southern University of Chile. Her work includes both practice and research. She is interested in the design of open spaces which contribute to conserve natural ecosystems as well as to provide environmental education for people. With this in mind, she has designed plazas, parks and botanical gardens in Chile. Her research area falls within the discipline of landscape perception, focused on exploring the relationship between people and landscape change due to the effects of disturbances. This is explored in both, the natural and the built environment in order to inform landscape management and design as well as urban and regional planning. Within this area of research, Paula has undertaken studies in landscapes subjected to controlled burnings and earthquakes, in woodland, wetlands and urban environments and in botanical gardens. Paula has presented her work in different conferences (IFLA, EDRA and IUFRO, among others) and published in international journals such as the Journal of Environmental Psychology and Landscape Research. In 2011 she received a grant from the National Commission for Scientific and Technological Research of Chile (CONICYT) to study communities’ perception of landscapes that contribute to urban resilience and earthquake recovery in the cities of Concepción and Valdivia in Chile (FONDECYT N. 11110297). Paula is also the Chilean delegate of IFLA and the Chair of the Communication Committee of IFLA. 

 Phil Wihongi

Phil Wihongi

Phil’s whakapapa links are to Ngati Hine and Ngāpuhi iwi within Tai Tokerau, alongside his Scottish ancestry which arrived on Aotearoa’s warm and fertile shores in 1853.
Phil is a landscape architect/planner whose practice is guided by his taha Māori. Phil considers the most important part of his practice to be working collaboratively to develop and share Māori environmental understandings, and identifying pathways for the safe transfer of traditional knowledge and narrative into the modern context.
Another key area of interest is working to encourage the success of Māori landscape architecture students, raising the profile of Māori landscape architects, and fostering a wider awareness of Māori design amongst the design professions.

 Thomas Woltz, ©Jessica Antola

Thomas Woltz

Thomas Woltz is the owner of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects (NBW) with offices in New York City, Charlottesville VA, and San Francisco CA. Hailed as one of the rising stars in the profession of landscape architecture, he was recently awarded the inaugural Thomas N. Armstrong III Award in Landscape Design by the New York School of Interior Design. In 2011, he was invested into the American Society of Landscape Architects Council of Fellows, among the highest honors achieved in the profession. During the past 18 years of practice, Woltz has forged a body of work that integrates the beauty and function of built form and craftsmanship with an understanding of complex biological systems and restoration ecology that has yielded hundreds of acres of reconstructed wetlands, reforested land, native meadows, and flourishing wildlife habitat. His design work infuses places where people live, work, and play with narratives of the land that inspire stewardship. Many of these projects focus on restoration of damaged ecological infrastructure within working farmland and create models of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. The work of NBW has been recognized with over 80 national and regional awards and been published widely. The firm has worked in 22 states and 9 countries.
 
Woltz was educated at the University of Virginia in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, fine art, and architectural history. He holds master degrees in Landscape Architecture and Architecture. After working in Venice Italy and Paris France, he returned to the States to launch his career in landscape architecture. Current work includes projects at Hudson Yards East (NY), Google Corporate Headquarters (CA), Catalina Island (CA), and Devonian Botanic Garden (Edmonton, Canada). Woltz serves on the Boards of Directors of tclf  (The Cultural Landscape Foundation) and MAS  (New York Municipal Arts Society). He was recently profiled in Elle Decor and Garden Design magazine and is an avid gardener.

 

Parallel Indigenous Session

Coffin_Antoine

Antoine Coffin

Antoine Coffin hails from Ngati Ranginui, Ngaiterangi, and Ngati Raukawa iwi of Tauranga. He recently completed the Ngati Ranginui Treaty Settlement and was establishment chairman of the Tauranga Moana Iwi Property Management Company.   He has held a number of community and iwi positions including Chair of the Ngati Ranginui Fisheries Trust and Deputy Chair of the Ngati Ranginui Iwi Society, director Moana Communications, and co-chair of the World Indigenous Section of International Association for Impact Assessment (USA). He has particular expertise in indigenous community development and cultural heritage management. Antoine enjoys leading and supporting strategic processes that build community knowledge and capacity.

Antoine is a Principal at the NZ-owned environmental consultancy company, Boffa Miskell.  Antoine is a qualified Company Director, Independent Commissioner and holds qualifications in Environmental Studies, Māori Language, and Strategic Leadership. 

Hoskins_Rau

Rau Hoskins

Rau Hoskins is of Ngāti Hau, Ngāpuhi, and is a director of the architectural practice, Design Tribe, specialising in kaupapa Māori design. Rau has lectured in Māori architecture at the Auckland and UNITEC Schools of Architecture since 1990 and currently co-heads Te Hononga - The Centre for Māori Architecture and Appropriate Technologies at Unitec. Rau wrote the Māori Housing design guide in 2002 and is chair of the steering group that developed the Te Aranga Māori Cultural Landscape Strategy in 2006. Rau is the Chair of Te Matapihi, the national Māori housing support body and an adviser to the Minister of Housing on the Social Housing Unit and Social housing policy, and remains active in Māori housing advocacy and papakāinga design projects. Rau presented the 13 part Whare Māori television series which screened on Māori Television in 2011.

Rau has also worked extensively as an urban and cultural design consultant, as well as in iwi liaison capacities on a range of large public projects.

 Williams, Haare

Haare Williams

Haare Williams was raised by his grandparents in the small coastal settlement of Ohiwa, and is of Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Rongowhakaata and Tuhoe. Haare has a long and distinguished career in education, health, broadcasting, and has made considerable contribution to the communities of Aotearoa. Haare has a deep and profound love for his first language Te Reo Māori, and continues to work tirelessly in the promotion and preservation of the language.

Amongst his many other accomplishments, Haare is also a poet, author and is an exhibiting artist.

Hei paia i te ara e noho tahi ai, e mahi tahi ai nga taha e rua kia tau iawa ai nga oranga ki te katoa.

"A broker between two people, two organisations or two communities to gain benefits for members, thus meet their need to belong, to learn, to succeed and to grow."

 Clarke_Josephine

Josephine Clarke

Josephine connects to Ngāti Porou, Te Rarawa, Te Aupōuri and Ngāti Rangi.

A recent Māori Landscape Architecture Graduate, Josephine has a passion for strengthening awareness of Tikanga Māori (Māori practices and protocols) and Mātauranga Māori (traditional Māori knowledge) within the profession of Landscape Architecture. She seeks to develop indigenous ideas and concepts to create novel design solutions which recognise and respect Māori relationships with their environment, which she feels will help to bridge current cross-cultural gaps.

Josephine enjoys working closely with communities, particularly local iwi (Māori tribal grouping) and youth of all cultures. Josephine believes strongly in the empowerment of indigenous people through meaningful engagement and appropriate acknowledgement, and looks to identify ways of integrating traditional knowledge to provide a deeper understanding of our environment, with tangible benefits for all.

 Menzies_Diane

Diane Menzies

Diane Menzies ties to Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Whatui Apiti and has recently moved to Auckland. Di has qualifications in landscape architecture, horticulture, business administration and completed a doctorate in resource studies in 1999: Di has run her own consultancy since 2000, and has had over twenty-five years’ experience in landscape planning and management in private and public government in New Zealand and Britain. Di was appointed to the Environment Court of New Zealand as a Commissioner in 2001, and has recently taken up academic positions with Victoria University in Wellington and Unitec Institute of Technology in Auckland.

Di is a past president and former Secretary General of the International Federation of Landscape Architects, and a past president of New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects. Di is also the New Zealand representative on the ICOMOS IFLA international committee on cultural landscapes.

 Scott_Jacob

Jacob Scott

Jacob Scott is of Ngāti Kahungunu, Te Arawa, Ngāti Raukawa and Te Atiawa.

Jacob is principal of Scott Design and Leader for the Awatoru Masters of Design programme at Unitec.  Former Director Te Kura Toi o Te Wananga o Aotearoa and founder and Head of EITs Art & Design School, and is one of our countries pioneers in contemporary Māori Art and Māori Arts Education. Highly regarded as an architectural designer and artist Jacob led the development, accreditation and establishment of the Maunga Kura Toi Degree – New Zealand’s first degree level programme in whakairo (carving) and raranga (weaving). As a past member of the whakaruruhau whakairo (national educational development committee for carving) and honorary holder of the Toi Iho Mark (mark of authenticity and quality for Māori artists) - Jacob is frequently called upon to assist with the development of a wide range of design project throughout the country.

Jacob has recently developed Carvex, an exciting new carving process that has the potential for a wide range of applications to help put more of our faces in our places.